hipnews Summer 2013 Edition
 
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Beach Ball hip hop Launches Summer 2013
Beach Ball Boomerang Raffle
Save the Date for the Annual Meeting
Braille a Necessity for Students with Vision Loss
Thanks to Some Very Generous Donors
Introducing Tech Talk!
Peter Cafone Joins hip Board
Taking a Cue from TV’s Immortal Show – I LOVE LUCY
Alanna, You Will Be Missed...
“Dare to Dream” Continues to Inspire Students
Smoothing the Path to College for Lodi Twins
"Three Strikes and...!"
Two New Faces at Bergen hip
Bergen Meeting Previews Fun at Our County Parks
“The Times, They Are A-Changing...”
New Upcoming hip happenings
We Mourn . . .
LEAD: Did We Hear “Perfect”??
2013 New Members
Our New Journey Raffle Under Way
It’s Summer and Hurricane Season – Be Prepared!
When Friends Get Together
Bergen Bassmasters 25th Annual Fishing Derby
Women's Support Group Adopts New Name
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- hipnews Summer 2013 Edition Text Version -


  Beach Ball hip hop Launches Summer 2013
  
 Beach Ball hip hop Launches Summer 2013 with Music and Merriment

Everyone who came to hip’s Beach Ball hip hop on May 18th left in a happy mood. The Jersey Shore was the unanimous choice as the theme for this year’s major fund-raising event, and very quickly, beach balls became the symbol for the light-hearted event planned by the dinner dance committee, headed by Lottie Esteban. The decorations, conceived and produced by Trish Carney, with assistance from a hardy band of volunteers, were nothing short of spectacular.
Congratulations and thanks to all who worked so hard to create a memorable evening.
Like our past galas, Beach Ball hip hop was held at the Fort Lee Recreation Center – no surf, it’s true, but there was even some sand – and party-goers felt as if they are at the ocean as soon as they stepped in the door. Music and entertainment by our special DJ, Gary Morton, put everyone in a summertime mood. In addition to our usual great dinner menu, this year some surprise edible treats had a special Boardwalk “bounce.” Dancing to Gary’s music started early and ended late – the highlight of the evening.
 
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  Beach Ball Boomerang Raffle
  
 Beach Ball Boomerang Raffle Brightening Up Our Summer – A Nationwide Sensation!

Our “Beach Ball Boomerang Raffle“ is the talk of the town! Beach balls have bounced all over the country! While the majority of the 411 ticket holders are from New Jersey, we also have subscribers from New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Maryland, North Carolina, Georgia, Texas, Arizona, Illinois, Wisconsin, and California.
At the Bergen hip office, we’re having a great time picking winners each Monday. Everyone in the office is taking turns to pull the lucky five tickets for that week. The fun will last all summer, until the final drawing on August 30th. Check out the winners by visiting the hip website, www.hipcil.org, from Tuesday at 10 a.m. on through the week. Thanks to everyone who has supported our effort, and good luck to all!
 
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  Save the Date for the Annual Meeting
  
 Save the Date! November 19th Marks hip’s 2013 Annual Meeting

Plans are under way for hip’s 2013 annual meeting at the Ridgefield Community Center. Mark your calendar for Tuesday evening, November 19th, and plan to join us to get the latest information about how the new health care law will affect you. You will also learn about all the exciting things that have taken place at hip during the past year.
 
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  Braille a Necessity for Students with Vision Loss
  
 Braille a Necessity for Students with Vision Loss, Says U.S. Dept. of Education

A commonly heard statement is, “There isn’t much need for braille today, due to the availability of assistive technology.” According to hip CEO Eileen Goff, “A person who cannot read print or braille is illiterate. Technology is a critical enhancement to one’s life when you have vision loss, just as it is to everyone who can see. However, there are so many things that you cannot do in your life if you cannot read. Consider using a shopping list at the market, labeling papers so they can be identified later, being able to spell, noting the amount of a check, or finding the correct floor on an elevator.”
Evidently, the U.S. Department of Education agrees with Eileen. A news release from the Office of Special Education & Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) cites a Dear Colleague letter on the subject of braille, issued on Wednesday, June 19th. The information it contains is helpful in clarifying the application of the IDEA requirements regarding braille instruction for children who are blind or visually impaired.
“The U.S. Department of Education is committed to ensuring that children who are blind and visually impaired have access to braille instruction and braille materials,” said Michael Yudin, acting assistant secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. “The ability to read and write braille competently and efficiently is critical to ensuring that students who are blind and visually impaired graduate from high school and college, and are career ready.”
The purpose of the letter is to provide guidance to states and public agencies to reaffirm the importance of braille instruction as a literacy tool for blind and visually impaired students, to clarify the circumstances in which braille instruction should be provided, and to reiterate the scope of an evaluation required to guide decisions of IEP teams in this area. The letter also identifies resources that are designed to help strengthen the capacity of state and local personnel to meet the needs of students who are blind or visually impaired.
hip’s Multimedia Transcription Project has been producing braille textbooks since 2002 for students across the nation. MTS ensures that textbooks are available to students at the same time their sighted counterparts receive books in print.
 
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  Thanks to Some Very Generous Donors
  
 hip receives many contributions from individuals and the community throughout the year. We thank the following for their recent exceptional generosity:
Bergenfield Lions Club
Michael and Marie Cook
Ken and Sandy Holcomb
The Kaplen Foundation
Lions Club of River Edge
Donn Slonim
Richard S. Wolfman
Family Foundation
We also thank Diane and Michael Albarella for their annual gift to purchase an air conditioner for a senior citizen, and Lillian Ciufo, Steven Ciufo, and Elsie O’Neill for their contributions to Laura’s Legacy.
 
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  Introducing Tech Talk!
  
 Our new column, Tech Talk, will bring together the latest news about activities and innovations that involve assistive technology (AT) and the talented people who “make it happen” here at hip.
ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND SELF-ADVOCACY PROJECT ENLISTS PARTNERS
An innovative project in assistive technology and self-advocacy training for high school students in Bergen County has engaged hip in a partnership with Adam Krass Consulting, LLC, and the Region V Council for Special Education, led by Maureen Kerne. Funding for the project was supplied through a grant from Disability Rights New Jersey (DRNJ).
Adam Krass, who has been working with hip as an assistive technology specialist, demonstrated a variety of free and moderately-priced AT equipment to students at Teaneck High School, River Dell High School, and at Cresskill’s “Community Steps to Independence” program, to help students assess their accommodation needs as they establish their post-secondary goals. Some of the equipment was “free standing,” while others were apps for iPhones, iPads, etc.
As a follow-up to the demonstrations, Alanna Staton, hip’s Independent Living transition coordinator, provided self-advocacy training to the students to prepare them to address their own specific needs while in college or in their careers.
MEET OUR NEWEST TECHNOLOGY SPECIALIST
Trisha Ebel has received certification in Assistive Technology for Supported Employment from Advancing Opportunities. She will be available to provide information and demonstrations to students and families who were involved in the training noted above, at the Bergen CIL (by appointment). For more information, contact Trisha at Ex. 10.
DON PERLMAN, TAKE A BOW!
Don has been hip’s computer guru for 20 years. He continually reviews our IT needs, making sure that all our computers and auxiliary equipment are up-to-date and functioning smoothly. He recently was a key player in the installation of a server to keep all hip documents safe and secure. Thanks to Don for his invaluable work, for his talent and dedication over the years, and here’s to many more!
ADAM KRASS AVAILABLE
ONE-ON-ONE
Our dedicated assistive technology consultant, Adam offers one-on-one assistance to people with disabilities on the last Tuesday of each month at the Bergen hip office, 9 a.m. – 12 Noon. Adam demonstrates the newest technology to enhance life at home and at work. His next two dates are August 20th and September 24th. To make an appointment, contact Trisha Ebel (Ext. 10). There is no charge.
Look for more Tech Talk in the next hipNEWS.
 
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  Peter Cafone Joins hip Board
  
 At its April meeting, the hip Board of Trustees elected Peter Cafone to interim membership. A resident of Ridgewood, Peter is newly retired after a 32-year career with Bergen County Social Services. He was supervisor of the Global Options program for his final nine years with the County. Peter’s name will be introduced as a nominee for a full Board term at the Annual Meeting in November.
 
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  Taking a Cue from TV’s Immortal Show – I LOVE LUCY
  
 Lucy Montalvo joined the hip staff in 1989 as the coordinator of the Hispanic Outreach Program at the Bergen CIL. Over the years she worked with hundreds of people, most of whom were Spanish speaking. Lucy enrolled consumers into programs that assisted in such areas as Social Security, housing, food stamps, utilities, and Medicaid. She also helped them navigate the immigration process. Probably Lucy’s most enjoyable area
was working with young adults in the long-standing “On the Move” program. She designed leisure-time activities including the Circle Line boat trip around Manhattan, museum tours, movie trips, bowling, and so much more. All the young people she worked with loved her very much.
Lucy has now decided to retire, and devote time to her family. All the hippies join with me in wishing her the best of luck, and in thanking her for her many years of devotion to the consumers of our Center for Independent Living. We all join together to say, “WE LOVE LUCY!”
– Eileen Goff

AND NOW, A WORD FROM LUCY:
It is with regret that I have to take
an early retirement. Unfortunately my health and family obligations have to become a priority. I’ll miss everyone
at hip, my consumers, and everyone
who has touched my life. I hope that
hip continues to grow and have many
successes in their continued effort to help people with disabilities.
– Love to all, Lucy Montalvo
 
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  Alanna, You Will Be Missed...
  
 The articles on this page are exemplary of the excellent professional contribution to our agency that Alanna Staton has made over the past several years. As she and her husband pursue their dreams, we wish them bon voyage! The growing Staton family will move very soon to Ecuador, where Alanna’s husband has been offered the opportunity to teach theatre arts in an American school in a suburb of the capital city, Quito. Thank you, Alanna, for your dedication to the educational goals of young people: the students you helped, and your colleagues at hip, will miss you!
– E.G.
 
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  “Dare to Dream” Continues to Inspire Students
  
 “Dare to Dream” Continues to Inspire Students with Disabilities
by Alanna Staton Independent Living Transition Coordinator

“Dare to Dream“ student leadership conferences are sponsored annually by the New Jersey Department of Education in seven regions of the state. Accomplished students and young adults with disabilities who have demonstrated exemplary self-advocacy and leadership skills give keynote addresses. A variety of workshops provide opportunities for students to gain insight into the transition process from school to adult life. NJDOE says, “The conference gives students the unique opportunity to participate in workshops led by their peers on topics such as: self-discovery, student self-advocacy, learning styles, developing a career path, and understanding your rights and responsibilities in college. ‘Dare to Dream’ has long been a positive and empowering experience for thousands of New Jersey’s students.”
This year the Student Leadership Conference was held at Montclair State University on May 31st. Keynoter Mark Farrell spoke to hundreds of attendees about finding his motivation. Mr. Farrell grew up with retinoschisis, a type of vision loss. Despite the challenges he faced as a young adult, he only allowed his differences to make him stronger. Because of his internal drive, he is now a regular participant in triathlons. He told the students that perseverance, knowing how to ask for assistance, and loving oneself are some of life’s most essential elements.
Breakout sessions were all led by high school students. Each year, hip’s transition coordinator works with a group of students to help them prepare to present at the conference. This year, hip worked with the Springboard Program to offer a workshop on goal setting. Student presenters spoke to large groups of their peers about the importance of having a dream, and what steps they might take to reach their goals. Audience members were invited to come up to the microphone to voice their dreams for the future.
The popularity of the conference is evident in the overflow attendance, and seating was limited in the main ballroom. Because students are given the opportunity to hear empowering messages from other youth with disabilities, as well as the opportunity to network with hundreds of their peers, they are eager to return year after year. The conferences are usually held in May, and schools are invited to attend by the NJDOE. Students interested in participating should ask their school’s transition coordinator or child study team for more information.
 
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  Smoothing the Path to College for Lodi Twins
  
 Smoothing the Path to College for Lodi Twins Eloy and Fernando
by Alanna Staton Independent Living Transition Coordinator

As any high school senior knows, the transition from high school to adult life can be highly exciting, but also a little daunting. There is so much to accomplish during the final year of high school, especially if the goal is to move on to college. This process can become even more daunting when you are trying to navigate the ins and outs of ensuring that the accommodations for your disability are still in place once you move on to college. Earlier this year, a set of twins from Lodi High School, Eloy and Fernando Almonte, approached me for assistance in achieving their goal of attending college. An initial meeting with the twins and their mother, Nelly Lebron, revealed that several steps needed to be taken to meet that goal. First, they had to register for the SAT. However, because both have learning disabilities, they wanted to ensure that they would receive the proper accommodations while taking the SAT. All students need to be given a fair playing field, so after working with the College Board’s Services for Students with Disabilities, the twins were approved for small-group settings and extended time on the SAT.
Both Eloy and Fernando are athletic, but Fernando had been contacted by several area colleges about his talent for football. The young men wanted to stay together, so the next step was to contact several colleges to find out which post-secondary settings would accommodate their needs. To do this, we got in touch with the Office of Special Services at the colleges and asked what type of documentation they would need to provide appropriate accommodations. When transitioning from high school to college, students are moving from a system of entitlement to a system of eligibility. Most colleges need a copy of the Individualized Education Program (IEP), but they especially need the most recent psychological assessment to prove that assistance is still needed.
After months of working closely with the family, they received the news all seniors anticipate: acceptance to the college of their choice! Eloy and Fernando will be attending Lebanon Valley College in Annville, Pennsylvania, in the fall, and both will receive the academic accommodations they require. Their mother says, “The most important thing to me is that other kids and parents know that they too have a chance to go to school if they have a disability.” Fernando will be making strong safety and return punts and kickoffs on the school’s football team, while Eloy will be competing in Lebanon’s track program. Both young men are determined to keep their record of success in all that they do in the future.
 
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  "Three Strikes and...!"
  
 With regret, it was necessary to cancel the Bergen hip picnic for 2013, after three tries. Threats of rain, combined with unusually high temperatures, forced the final decision. But, as they say in baseball lingo, “Wait till next year!”
 
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  Two New Faces at Bergen hip
  
 Ashley Devine joined the hip staff in May as Bergen hip’s new Care Manager. She is a graduate of Ramapo College with a bachelor’s degree in Social Work. Ashley served as an intern with Shelter Our Sisters and Meals on Wheels during her time at Ramapo. A resident of Mahwah, Ashley takes pride in caring for her Siberian husky puppy, Archer.

Patricia Rodriguez joined the hip staff in June to prepare for assuming the position of Independent Living transition coordinator upon the departure of Alanna Staton in July. Prior to working at hip, Pat was a special education teacher for seven years at School #30 in Paterson. She received her bachelor’s degree from Montclair State University and her Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree from William Paterson University. Pat and her family live in Hackensack. In her spare time, she conducts research on education topics.
Welcome to both new members of our hip staff!
 
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  Bergen Meeting Previews Fun at Our County Parks
  
 A group of 35 hip members and friends attended a “Fun in the Springtime” presentation at the Ciarco Learning Center in Hackensack on the evening of April 9th. Michele Daly, director of disability education at the Meadowlands Environment Center in Lyndhurst, and Ronald Kistner, director of the Bergen County Department of Parks, were enthusiastic in describing the welcoming features of their respective recreational facilities. Both speakers gave useful information to their appreciative audience about the outdoor activities, programs, and events the parks and the Environment Center have to offer.
 
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  “The Times, They Are A-Changing...”
  
 As the participants in hip’s Adjustment to Vision Loss program have recently learned, our agency will no longer receive funds which were previously available over the past 10 years. While this is a great loss to our AVL peer support network, hip will continue to work with these groups as they meet throughout the 14 northern and central New Jersey counties – just differently from how we have done it in the past. hip staff member Trisha Ebel will be the direct facilitator for the majority of Bergen County-based AVL groups. She will also serve as a contact and resource person for all other groups throughout the target AVL network. If you or someone you know wishes to find out more or join an AVL peer support group, call Trisha at the Bergen office (Ext. 10).
AVL has been a critical resource for countless individuals as they have undergone their adjustment process and acquired strength, support, and skills to move forward in a positive manner with the remainder of their lives. We thank the NJ Commission for the Blind & Visually Impaired, and the Merck Company Foundation for their support over the years.
The spring Facilitator Training session, held in April in East Brunswick, demonstrated how well peer support groups can function on their own by using bold, imaginative, and essentially simple techniques. “Learn New Things by Doing” was the theme of the workshop led by Dr. Cathy Deats, LCSW, and Reverend James Warnke, LCSW, who have been with the AVL program from the start. They engaged facilitators in role-playing – participants had to pretend to be themselves or someone in their support group. Cathy and Jim then played the role of support group leader, asking each member to act out who they were and how they would respond to certain situations. One “character” antagonized other group members, and it was enlightening for the members to observe how a skilled facilitator can help ease a situation and restore the group to a balanced and harmonious “playing field.”
The loss of funding has made it necessary to bid goodbye to longtime AVL coordinator, Susan Vanino. Susan was a dedicated support person to the many groups she worked with, and we wish her well as she pursues new professional endeavors.
 
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  New Upcoming hip happenings
  
 by Trisha Ebel
PLANTING THE SEED
Are you a person who enjoys creating, then participating in an ongoing project? If the answer is yes, then perhaps you would like to be a part of hip’s new garden project, now in the making. If you are eager and able to dedicate some time to a garden project, call me at Bergen hip (extension 10) for more details. A central location in Bergen county will be selected for the garden – this is important because transportation will be “on
your own.” We’re looking for eager gardeners who are willing to teach and learn – people who will commit time and effort from planting, to blooming, to harvest.

SIT BACK AND RELAX!!!
If you enjoy sitting back, relaxing, and reading a good book, our new book club may be for you. I am looking for some hip friends to come to our Hackensack office once a month to participate in a discussion about a book that members have read in the previous month. You will select the books. Give me a call at extension 10 if you would like to join.
 
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  We Mourn . . .
  
 the passing of Anthony Gilio, III on July 23rd. Although cancer took his life, cancer did not take Anthony’s positive attitude, determination and good spirits. Anthony, age 17, was a member of the LEAD program for the past three years. “Anthony, thank you for teaching me never to give up!”
—Joe Ruffalo, LEAD Coordinator

We also mourn the loss of two hip members, Mario DeAppolonio and David Garippa.
 
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  LEAD: Did We Hear “Perfect”??
  
 LEAD: Did We Hear “Perfect”?? A Message from Joe Ruffalo, LEAD Mentor

Greetings to all! Thanks for a great day at Camp Marcella on Saturday, June 8th. The day was perfect! The activities were perfect, as we highlighted things learned throughout the LEAD year. The graduation ceremony was perfect. The food, provided by Peter Valavanis, was also perfect: hot dogs, chicken strips, funnel cake, fries, soda, and ices.
The talent show was perfect. You can guess, when we have a perfect group of concerned hip and LEAD mentors, with perfect chaperones, the only result is perfection! Thanks for a great year – it flew by!
Our students have spoken eloquently about the impact LEAD has had on their lives. The vast majority spoke about their improved self-confidence and self-advocacy skills, in addition to how much they benefited from developing time management skills. Below is a sampling of their comments:
“There’s more to learn, but my blindness skills are much better.”
“I’ve met amazing people, both my fellow students and the LEAD mentors.”
“I learned more about the person I am.”
“My mobility and general independence are improved.”
“I’m more social with kids who can see and those who cannot.”
“I used to have a lot of questions about the abilities of blind people. Now I know my only limits are the ones I put on myself.”
“I am no longer afraid to travel alone.”
“I am better about standing up for my beliefs.”
“I laugh more now.”
From Nikki: “I will stay true to myself, my ways, and beliefs. I will lead my own life and follow my passions. It is no life but mine to live, and I will live it to the fullest.”

LEAD 2013 GRADUATES!
Northern Region: Briasia Beasley, Brittani Brendel, Debbie Bennett, Michael Clapcich, Shadiyyah Harell, Kyle Kreske, Adriana Moquillaza, Alyssa Shock, Allison Van Etten.
Central Region: Nikhil Dhage, Romy Lopez, Jameisha Murrell, Andrew Smith, Stephanie Zundel.
Southern Region: Mitch Cossadoon, AJ Selko.
 
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  2013 New Members
  
 We’re pleased to welcome the following new and renewing members of hip:
Michael & Diane Albarella
Angela Brown
Barbara Comerford*
Dolores Cordier
Mary Drylewicz
Lisa Gilmartin
Louise Lee
Dennis McCarthy
Ador M. Peralta
Muriel Robinson
Ryan Roy
Steven Savino
Donn Slonim
The Stolfo family
Donald H. Williams
Corporate member:
John Winer – Jewish Association
of Developmental Disabilities
(www.j-add.org)
* Life Member
 
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  Our New Journey Raffle Under Way
  
 Our New Journey is embarking on their annual fundraising Gift Raffle. Funds raised will allow continued financial support for direct care services to the families served. The raffle includes three prizes. First and second prizes are $300 and $100 gift cards to Stop & Shop. Third prize is a gift basket ($75 value). Tickets are two dollars each with five tickets in a book. The drawing takes place on September 2nd at 180 Oldfield Ave., Hasbrouck Heights.
If you are able to offer your support, please let Anne McMahon know how many books you will need or if you have any ideas on ways to sell tickets. E-mail: anne@ournewjourney.org or call 201-288-2867. (Fax: 201-257-8354)
Our New Journey supports families of the elderly and people with disabilities through limited financial support for direct care assistance; individual guidance in understanding personal needs; help with locating available services; and caregiver peer support.
 
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  It’s Summer and Hurricane Season – Be Prepared!
  
 by Kathy Wood, Hudson hip Director

As I write this article, it is warm and sunny on the first day of summer. We can all hope that the weather will continue to be tranquil and we will never again face a situation like Hurricane Sandy or any worse natural or man-made disaster. However, we all know that life is unpredictable so we would be wise to prepare to the best of our ability for whatever might happen. I know, we’ve all heard the warnings and seen the information a million times, but here it is once more. Please take it seriously!
Register Ready NJ is a voluntary, confidential registry for people who might need assistance in an emergency. By registering, people who have disabilities can provide information to assist emergency planners in setting up special needs shelters and making other arrangements for people who haveaccess and functional needs. In addition, emergency planners may be able to provide important information about emergency situations to people who are registered. To register, go to www.registerready.nj.gov, or call 211 and an operator will help you to register. Be aware that the warning posted on the Register Ready website reads as follows:
“The first line of defense against the effects of a disaster is personal preparedness. During an emergency, the government and other agencies may not be able to meet your needs. It is important for all citizens to make their own emergency plans and prepare for their own care and safety in an emergency.”
FOR HOME, MAKE A BACK-UP PLAN
So, here are a few things you can do to prepare. First, think about what your needs might be in an emergency. In case the people who usually assist you can’t get to you, you should have friends or neighbors who will give you a hand. Be sure to talk to them in advance. They should know what your needs might be and agree to assist. Don’t assume. Also you need a back-up plan for how you might be able to accomplish critical self-care tasks without assistance, such as acquiring body wipes for bathing.
In case the power goes off, you should have a battery-operated radio (with extra batteries) or a hand- crank radio, flashlights with extra batteries, first aid supplies, a fire xtinguisher, a 3-5 day supply of food that doesn’t need to be refrigerated or cooked, a manual (non-electric) can opener, a landline phone or battery back-up for your cell phone, and extra cash in small bills (ATMs might not be working).
In case there is no water, you should have a 3-5 day supply of bottled water for drinking for you and pets or service animals, and containers to store water for bathing or flushing toilets (be sure to fill them at the first warning of an emergency).
In case you can’t leave your home for several days you should have extra medication, medical supplies, extra blankets in case the heat goes off, and a battery-operated fan and extra batteries.
NEED AN EMERGENCY SHELTER?
In case you must go to an emergency shelter, you should take the purse or bag you usually use, extra money (keep the amounts small, like five or one-dollar bills – ATMs may not functionduring a power outage). Also, paper towels, plastic bags
for throwing away trash, toilet paper andfeminine products, hand sanitizer or liquid soap, and a cell phone. Save your emergency contacts’ phone numbers under the name ICE – In Case of Emergency. Police officers or firefighters will know how to look for the number if you need help.
You will also need health information; emergency papers, like vaccination records and insurance policy numbers; medicine and copies of your prescriptions, making sure you have enough medicine to last at least seven days; a flashlight, a radio, and a watch or clock that run on batteries or can be wound; a signaling device, like a whistle, bell, or beeper; extra batteries, a blanket, a full change of clothing, extra socks, comfortable shoes; special equipment specific to your needs, like extra contact lenses or glasses, communication devices, laptop computers, hearing aids and batteries, or mobility aids.
When preparing your emergency supply kit, make sure the supplies work well and won’t break easily.
Choose a safe place for your kit: dark spaces with cool temperatures, like a closet or an accessible spot in your garage, are good options.
 
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  When Friends Get Together
  
 Twenty-five hip friends met on April 17th to celebrate spring at Main Dish Restaurant in Hackensack.
They enjoyed a delicious lunch along with wonderful conversation and congeniality. This was a great opportunity to renew ties with old friends and to make new ones. Smiles and laughter filled the room. hip’s second “friends luncheon“ was a big hit!
 
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  Bergen Bassmasters 25th Annual Fishing Derby
  
 The Bergen Bassmasters held their 25th Annual Fishing Derby on Saturday, June 8th at Darlington Park in Mahwah. A group of 20 hip members attended this event. Several won trophies for their fishing accomplishments. In addition to a delicious barbeque, the 200 attendees received t-shirts, mini-flashlights, medals, and backpacks to commemorate the anniversary.
 
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  Women's Support Group Adopts New Name
  
 Congratulations to the members of hip's Women's Support Group. They are celebrating their new name, "Empowering Women."
 
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